Marine Corps Recruit Depot

 

Marine Corps Recruit Depot

Eastern Recruiting Region

Parris Island, South Carolina
Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, center, speaks with Sgt. Maj. of the Marine Corps Ronald Green, left, and 1st Lt. Terri L. Piekosz, a series commander with November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, March 3, 2016, on Parris Island, S.C. Mabus visited Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island in order to see firsthand how young men and women from across the country are transformed into United States Marines. Recruit training was consolidated under Recruit Training Regiment in 1986, and since then, all those desiring to complete recruit training must follow the same training program of instruction, and must complete the same graduation requirements. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Greg Thomas)
Secretary of the Navy observes recruit training on Parris Island
Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, center, speaks with Sgt. Maj. of the Marine Corps Ronald Green, left, and 1st Lt. Terri L. Piekosz, a series commander with November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, March 3, 2016, on Parris Island, S.C. Mabus visited Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island in order to see firsthand how young men and women from across the country are transformed into United States Marines. Recruit training was consolidated under Recruit Training Regiment in 1986, and since then, all those desiring to complete recruit training must follow the same training program of instruction, and must complete the same graduation requirements. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Greg Thomas)
Staff Sgt. Roger L. Petersen currently serves as a Marine Corps drill instructor with Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Petersen joined the Marine Corps in June 2001 and became a drill instructor in June 2014. “I became a drill instructor because I wanted to give back to the Marine Corps,” said Petersen, a 32-year-old native of Wichita Falls, Texas. “I have been in for 14 years, and being a drill instructor was one of the only things I haven’t done yet.” About 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
Marine Corps Drill Instructor - the epitome of professionalism
Staff Sgt. Roger L. Petersen currently serves as a Marine Corps drill instructor with Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Petersen joined the Marine Corps in June 2001 and became a drill instructor in June 2014. “I became a drill instructor because I wanted to give back to the Marine Corps,” said Petersen, a 32-year-old native of Wichita Falls, Texas. “I have been in for 14 years, and being a drill instructor was one of the only things I haven’t done yet.” About 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
Recruits of November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, maneuver under concertina wire on a combat training course March 24, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. These skills will be broadened during follow-on training at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Pfc. Vanessa Austin)
Marine recruits learn basic combat skills on Parris Island
Recruits of November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, maneuver under concertina wire on a combat training course March 24, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. These skills will be broadened during follow-on training at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Pfc. Vanessa Austin)
Drill Instructor Staff Sgt. Maurice S. Jones, with Platoon 3038, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, encourages his recruits to push themselves through an incentive training session March 5, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors, such as Jones, 28, from Philadelphia, must instill in recruits. India Company is scheduled to graduate May 15, 2015. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
There will be intensity
Drill Instructor Staff Sgt. Maurice S. Jones, with Platoon 3038, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, encourages his recruits to push themselves through an incentive training session March 5, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors, such as Jones, 28, from Philadelphia, must instill in recruits. India Company is scheduled to graduate May 15, 2015. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
Sgt. Stephan G. Bacchus, senior drill instructor of Platoon 3004, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, listens to his recruits’ explanation of leadership during a core values guided discussion Oct. 28, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. Bacchus, 25, from East Stroudsburg, Pa., discussed with his recruits the importance of growing as a leader both in and out of the Marine Corps. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 19,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Aaron Bolser)
We live by our corps values - Honor, Courage, Commitment
Sgt. Stephan G. Bacchus, senior drill instructor of Platoon 3004, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, listens to his recruits’ explanation of leadership during a core values guided discussion Oct. 28, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. Bacchus, 25, from East Stroudsburg, Pa., discussed with his recruits the importance of growing as a leader both in and out of the Marine Corps. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 19,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Aaron Bolser)
Senior Drill Instructor Sgt. Christianna M. Wolford informs future recruits of drill instructors’ expectations upon their arrival to the receiving building Dec. 15, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the yellow footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. The first night comes as a shock for most recruits as they deal with stress, sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Wolford, 27, is from Ocala, Fla. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Caitlin Brink)
Marine recruits survive first night on Parris Island
Senior Drill Instructor Sgt. Christianna M. Wolford informs future recruits of drill instructors’ expectations upon their arrival to the receiving building Dec. 15, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the yellow footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. The first night comes as a shock for most recruits as they deal with stress, sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Wolford, 27, is from Ocala, Fla. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Caitlin Brink)
Rct. Tyler C. Cunningham, Platoon 1068, Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, crawls through a combat training course Aug. 4, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. The initial combat training recruits receive will be broadened after boot camp during follow-on training at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Cunningham, 23, is from Enfield, Conn. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vanessa Austin)
Marine recruits learn basic combat skills on Parris Island
Rct. Tyler C. Cunningham, Platoon 1068, Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, crawls through a combat training course Aug. 4, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. The initial combat training recruits receive will be broadened after boot camp during follow-on training at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Cunningham, 23, is from Enfield, Conn. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vanessa Austin)
Drill instructors for Platoon 1086, Charlie Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, recite the Drill Instructor Pledge on July 25, 2015, before taking charge of the young men they are expected to mold into Marines on Parris Island, S.C. In the pledge, drill instructors promise to train their recruits to the best of their abilities, meaning they will not give up on the recruits even when the recruits may give up on themselves. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
Parris Island recruits meet Marine Corps drill instructors
Drill instructors for Platoon 1086, Charlie Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, recite the Drill Instructor Pledge on July 25, 2015, before taking charge of the young men they are expected to mold into Marines on Parris Island, S.C. In the pledge, drill instructors promise to train their recruits to the best of their abilities, meaning they will not give up on the recruits even when the recruits may give up on themselves. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
Sgt. Yonique R. Cousins currently serves as a Marine Corps drill instructor with Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Cousins joined the Marine Corps in Aug. 2008 and became a drill instructor in Dec. 2014. “I strive hard for everything I do,” said Cousins, a 25-year-old native of McDonough, Ga. “No matter what obstacle may come my way, I will overcome it. That is why I’m here.” About 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
Never give up!
Sgt. Yonique R. Cousins currently serves as a Marine Corps drill instructor with Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Cousins joined the Marine Corps in Aug. 2008 and became a drill instructor in Dec. 2014. “I strive hard for everything I do,” said Cousins, a 25-year-old native of McDonough, Ga. “No matter what obstacle may come my way, I will overcome it. That is why I’m here.” About 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
A new Marine of Fox Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, greets his family following his graduation ceremony June 5, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The Marines spent nearly 13 weeks away from home training to earn their places in the Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
Graduation Ceremony
A new Marine of Fox Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, greets his family following his graduation ceremony June 5, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The Marines spent nearly 13 weeks away from home training to earn their places in the Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
Staff Sgt. Brian Sixto, a drill instructor for Platoon 3034, encourages Rct. Edgar Barua-Gomez, Platoon 3034, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to respond to orders March 12, 2014, during an incentive training session on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors like Sixto, 28, from Hobson, Texas, must instill in recruits. Barua-Gomez, 23, from Kensington, Md., is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
Staff Sgt. Brian Sixto, a drill instructor for Platoon 3034, encourages Rct. Edgar Barua-Gomez, Platoon 3034, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to respond to orders March 12, 2014, during an incentive training session on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors like Sixto, 28, from Hobson, Texas, must instill in recruits. Barua-Gomez, 23, from Kensington, Md., is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
Rct. Julian Morris carries Rct. Jacob Ligon, both with Platoon 2028, Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, during a martial arts endurance course Feb. 6, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course consists of different stations at which recruits practice martial arts techniques they learned earlier in training to increase their proficiency, strength and stamina. The course is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which combines hand-to-hand combat skills with mental discipline and character development to help transform recruits into honorable warriors. Morris, a 20-year-old native of Dover, N.J., and Ligon, a 19-year-old native of Monroe, La., are scheduled to graduate April 11, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple)
Parris Island recruits build strength, stamina to become Marines
Rct. Julian Morris carries Rct. Jacob Ligon, both with Platoon 2028, Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, during a martial arts endurance course Feb. 6, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course consists of different stations at which recruits practice martial arts techniques they learned earlier in training to increase their proficiency, strength and stamina. The course is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which combines hand-to-hand combat skills with mental discipline and character development to help transform recruits into honorable warriors. Morris, a 20-year-old native of Dover, N.J., and Ligon, a 19-year-old native of Monroe, La., are scheduled to graduate April 11, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple)
Rct. Jeremy Moore, Platoon 2010, Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, responds to orders from a Marine Corps martial arts instructor during a martial arts training session Nov. 14, 2013.
Rct. Jeremy Moore, Platoon 2010, Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, responds to orders from a Marine Corps martial arts instructor during a martial arts training session Nov. 14, 2013.
Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, race through an obstacle course Sept. 21, 2013, as part of a field meet on Parris Island, S.C. Drill instructors selected a team of recruits from each platoon to compete in various events such as tug of war, a relay race, an obstacle course race and a pushup competition. The meet is designed to motivate the recruits for the upcoming Crucible, the 54-hour culminating event of training.
Field meet on Parris Island
Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, race through an obstacle course Sept. 21, 2013, as part of a field meet on Parris Island, S.C. Drill instructors selected a team of recruits from each platoon to compete in various events such as tug of war, a relay race, an obstacle course race and a pushup competition. The meet is designed to motivate the recruits for the upcoming Crucible, the 54-hour culminating event of training.
New recruits prepare to step through the silver doors of the receiving building, an action which symbolizes the transition from civilians to recruits and the beginning of their transformation into United States Marines.
Through these doors ...
New recruits prepare to step through the silver doors of the receiving building, an action which symbolizes the transition from civilians to recruits and the beginning of their transformation into United States Marines.
Drill instructors use incentive training to instill discipline and motivation in recruits. Incentive training consists of physical exercises administered in a controlled and deliberate manner and is used to correct minor disciplinary infractions. The length of an incentive training session is based upon how far along recruits are in training.
Incentive training
Drill instructors use incentive training to instill discipline and motivation in recruits. Incentive training consists of physical exercises administered in a controlled and deliberate manner and is used to correct minor disciplinary infractions. The length of an incentive training session is based upon how far along recruits are in training.
Rct. Nathan Dix, a 19-year-old native of Pemberville, Ohio, is currently training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., in hopes of earning the title of United States Marine. Dix is training with Platoon 3074, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, and is scheduled to graduate Oct. 6, 2013. “I decided to join the Marine Corps because the Marine Corps offered a challenge that none of the other branches could offer me. The Marine Corps is respected and well known throughout the world, and anyone who wanted to be the best will join. I joined the military because … I wanted to fight for a cause that I believe in,” said Dix, who graduated from Eastwood High School in Luckey, Ohio, in 2011. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
One more for the Corps
Rct. Nathan Dix, a 19-year-old native of Pemberville, Ohio, is currently training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., in hopes of earning the title of United States Marine. Dix is training with Platoon 3074, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, and is scheduled to graduate Oct. 6, 2013. “I decided to join the Marine Corps because the Marine Corps offered a challenge that none of the other branches could offer me. The Marine Corps is respected and well known throughout the world, and anyone who wanted to be the best will join. I joined the military because … I wanted to fight for a cause that I believe in,” said Dix, who graduated from Eastwood High School in Luckey, Ohio, in 2011. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
Recruits of Golf, Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, climb over a wall during the obstacle course Feb. 25, 2013 on Parris Island.
Obstacle course
Recruits of Golf, Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, climb over a wall during the obstacle course Feb. 25, 2013 on Parris Island.
Recruits of Platoon 2065, Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, march in formation at the company’s final drill evaluation Aug. 21, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Close-order drill is a key part of Marine Corps recruit training because it develops discipline, confidence, teamwork and respect for authority. Platoon 2065 is led by Sgt. Edward Sortino, 25, grew up on Parris Island. Golf Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 30, 2013.  Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
Marine recruits graded on drill performance on Parris Island
Recruits of Platoon 2065, Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, march in formation at the company’s final drill evaluation Aug. 21, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Close-order drill is a key part of Marine Corps recruit training because it develops discipline, confidence, teamwork and respect for authority. Platoon 2065 is led by Sgt. Edward Sortino, 25, grew up on Parris Island. Golf Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 30, 2013. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. Christopher Otoki, honor graduate, Platoon 3016, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, stands at parade rest before marching onto the Peatross Parade Deck for the graduation ceremony of Mike and November Companies on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., March 9, 2012. Otoki earned the platoon honor graduate distinction with the highest combined score in physical fitness, rifle qualification and educational scores as well as demonstrating leadership.
Graduation ceremony
U.S. Marine Corps Pfc. Christopher Otoki, honor graduate, Platoon 3016, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, stands at parade rest before marching onto the Peatross Parade Deck for the graduation ceremony of Mike and November Companies on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., March 9, 2012. Otoki earned the platoon honor graduate distinction with the highest combined score in physical fitness, rifle qualification and educational scores as well as demonstrating leadership.
New Marines of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, run under the “We Make Marines” sign during a traditional motivational run through the streets of Parris Island, S.C., on Aug 15, 2013. The run took place before the new Marines had a few hours to reunite with their friends and families for the first time in more than 12 weeks. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 16, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
Motivational run pumps up Parris Island's newest Marines
New Marines of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, run under the “We Make Marines” sign during a traditional motivational run through the streets of Parris Island, S.C., on Aug 15, 2013. The run took place before the new Marines had a few hours to reunite with their friends and families for the first time in more than 12 weeks. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 16, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
Rct. Kenneth Phillips, 20, Platoon 2057, Fox Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, practices martial arts strikes during a warm-up before a Marine Corps Martial Arts Program endurance course June 20, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Drill instructors remediated recruits on martial arts techniques they would use on the course. MCMAP is used to help produce better physically and morally strong Marines. Phillips is from Montgomery, Ala., and is scheduled to graduate Aug. 2, 2013. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
Marine recruits increase endurance during martial arts course on Parris Island
Rct. Kenneth Phillips, 20, Platoon 2057, Fox Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, practices martial arts strikes during a warm-up before a Marine Corps Martial Arts Program endurance course June 20, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Drill instructors remediated recruits on martial arts techniques they would use on the course. MCMAP is used to help produce better physically and morally strong Marines. Phillips is from Montgomery, Ala., and is scheduled to graduate Aug. 2, 2013. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
New recruits rush off a bus and onto the yellow footprints on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the footprints they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. The first day is one of many they will spend learning what it takes to earn the title of United States Marine.
Yellow footprints
New recruits rush off a bus and onto the yellow footprints on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the footprints they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. The first day is one of many they will spend learning what it takes to earn the title of United States Marine.
Sgt. Roberto Martinez, 33, a martial arts instructor on Parris Island, initiates a pugil stick match during training July 8, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Each recruit participated in two 15-second matches. Recruits train with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate close-range encounter with an enemy. Bayonet training, along with other hand-to-hand fighting skills, is encompassed in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which contributes to the mental, character and physical development of Marines. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of for females in the Marine Corps. Martinez is from West Covina, Calif. Hotel Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 20, 2013. (Photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
Marine recruits spar with pugil sticks for bayonet training on Parris Island
Sgt. Roberto Martinez, 33, a martial arts instructor on Parris Island, initiates a pugil stick match during training July 8, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Each recruit participated in two 15-second matches. Recruits train with pugil sticks, which represent rifles with attached bayonets, to simulate close-range encounter with an enemy. Bayonet training, along with other hand-to-hand fighting skills, is encompassed in the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which contributes to the mental, character and physical development of Marines. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of for females in the Marine Corps. Martinez is from West Covina, Calif. Hotel Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 20, 2013. (Photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
Rct. Drew Wilson, Platoon 1053, Bravo Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, fires at his target June 26, 2013, on one of the rifle ranges on Parris Island, S.C. Wilson, a 23-year-old native of Clayton, Del., fired a total of 50 rounds at close-range targets in a series of shooting drills. The objective of marksmanship training is to develop, sustain and improve individual combat shooting skills. Bravo Company is scheduled to graduate July 19, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
Rounds down range
Rct. Drew Wilson, Platoon 1053, Bravo Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, fires at his target June 26, 2013, on one of the rifle ranges on Parris Island, S.C. Wilson, a 23-year-old native of Clayton, Del., fired a total of 50 rounds at close-range targets in a series of shooting drills. The objective of marksmanship training is to develop, sustain and improve individual combat shooting skills. Bravo Company is scheduled to graduate July 19, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
Unit Leaders

Brig. Gen. Terry V. Williams
Commanding General, Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island and Eastern Recruiting Region
VIEW BIO


Sgt. Maj. Angela M. Maness
Sergeant Major, Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island and Eastern Recruiting Region
VIEW BIO

RSS
Facebook
Mission

We make Marines by recruiting quality young men and women and transforming them through the foundations of rigorous basic training, our shared legacy, and a commitment to our core values, preparing them to win our nation’s battles in service to the country.


Featured Video

 

Info

destructive weather information

DSTRESS

MyBaseGuide

ICE