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Marine Corps Recruit Depot

Eastern Recruiting Region

Parris Island, South Carolina
Photo Gallery: Marine recruits survive first night on Parris Island

By Story by Cpl. Caitlin Brink | Marine Corps Recruit Depot | September 16, 2013

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Rct. Terence Goodman, Platoon 3089, Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, responds to one of the many orders he will receive with on Parris Island, S.C., during his first night of training Aug. 26, 2013. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the yellow footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. Goodman, 24, from Baltimore, is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Rct. Terence Goodman, Platoon 3089, Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, responds to one of the many orders he will receive with on Parris Island, S.C., during his first night of training Aug. 26, 2013. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the yellow footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. Goodman, 24, from Baltimore, is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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New recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, hold up identification cards as they begin their in-processing shortly after arriving on Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013. The recruits spent the night completing paperwork and receiving haircuts and new gear in preparation for the next 13 weeks. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

New recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, hold up identification cards as they begin their in-processing shortly after arriving on Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013. The recruits spent the night completing paperwork and receiving haircuts and new gear in preparation for the next 13 weeks. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Drill instructors lead new recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, through their first night of Marine Corps recruit training Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The first stressful night comes as a shock for most as they deal with sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Drill instructors lead new recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, through their first night of Marine Corps recruit training Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The first stressful night comes as a shock for most as they deal with sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Staff Sgt. Carlos Vargas, a senior drill instructor, commands future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to step off the bus and onto the yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The first stressful night comes as a shock for most as they deal with sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Vargas, 28, from Longmont, Colo., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Staff Sgt. Carlos Vargas, a senior drill instructor, commands future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to step off the bus and onto the yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The first stressful night comes as a shock for most as they deal with sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Vargas, 28, from Longmont, Colo., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Staff Sgt. Carlos Vargas, a senior drill instructor, issues orders to recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, shortly after their arrival to Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013.  Recruits learn from the moment they step on the yellow footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. Vargas, 28, from Longmont, Colo., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Staff Sgt. Carlos Vargas, a senior drill instructor, issues orders to recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, shortly after their arrival to Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the yellow footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. Vargas, 28, from Longmont, Colo., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Sgt. George Caldwell, a drill instructor, beckons new recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, through the silver doors and into the receiving building Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Stepping through the doors symbolizes the transition from civilians to recruits and the beginning of their transformation into United States Marines. Caldwell, 25, from Beckley, W.Va., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Sgt. George Caldwell, a drill instructor, beckons new recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, through the silver doors and into the receiving building Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Stepping through the doors symbolizes the transition from civilians to recruits and the beginning of their transformation into United States Marines. Caldwell, 25, from Beckley, W.Va., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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New recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, rush to obey orders from Sgt. Mario Rodriguez, a drill instructor, after their arrival to Marine Corps recruit training on Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013. The first stressful night comes as a shock for most as they deal with sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Rodriguez, 24, from Azle, Texas, is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

New recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, rush to obey orders from Sgt. Mario Rodriguez, a drill instructor, after their arrival to Marine Corps recruit training on Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013. The first stressful night comes as a shock for most as they deal with sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Rodriguez, 24, from Azle, Texas, is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Staff Sgt. Nicholas Granter, a senior drill instructor, orders future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to sit up straight and heed all commands following their arrival to training Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The first hour on the Island is one of many recruits will spend learning what it takes to earn the title of United States Marine. Granter, 28, from Mansfield, Ohio, is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Staff Sgt. Nicholas Granter, a senior drill instructor, orders future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to sit up straight and heed all commands following their arrival to training Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The first hour on the Island is one of many recruits will spend learning what it takes to earn the title of United States Marine. Granter, 28, from Mansfield, Ohio, is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Sgt. George Caldwell, a drill instructor, waits for the new recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to step through the silver doors of the receiving building, symbolizing their transition from civilian to Marine Corps recruits Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Caldwell, 25, from Beckley, W.Va., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Sgt. George Caldwell, a drill instructor, waits for the new recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to step through the silver doors of the receiving building, symbolizing their transition from civilian to Marine Corps recruits Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Caldwell, 25, from Beckley, W.Va., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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A few of the new recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, brought items with them to training Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Future Marine Corps recruits are only allowed to bring authorized items with them when arriving for training, such as religious material or an address book. Everything else is provided for them. Unnecessary items, such as their civilian clothing, are placed into storage until the week of graduation. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

A few of the new recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, brought items with them to training Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Future Marine Corps recruits are only allowed to bring authorized items with them when arriving for training, such as religious material or an address book. Everything else is provided for them. Unnecessary items, such as their civilian clothing, are placed into storage until the week of graduation. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, receive an introduction speech from a senior drill instructor as they stand on the yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, receive an introduction speech from a senior drill instructor as they stand on the yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, sprint out of vans and onto the yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Vehicles loaded with soon-to-be recruits began arriving at Parris IslandâEUR(TM)s receiving building at 6 p.m., and trickled in throughout the next few days. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, sprint out of vans and onto the yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Vehicles loaded with soon-to-be recruits began arriving at Parris IslandâEUR(TM)s receiving building at 6 p.m., and trickled in throughout the next few days. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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New recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, begin filling out in-processing paperwork shortly after arriving on Parris Island, S.C., for Marine Corps recruit training Aug. 26, 2013. The recruits spent the night completing paperwork and receiving haircuts and gear in preparation for the next 13 weeks. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

New recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, begin filling out in-processing paperwork shortly after arriving on Parris Island, S.C., for Marine Corps recruit training Aug. 26, 2013. The recruits spent the night completing paperwork and receiving haircuts and gear in preparation for the next 13 weeks. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Sgt. Abraham Miller, a drill instructor, directs recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, into the receiving building Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Miller, 26, from Trenton, N.J., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Sgt. Abraham Miller, a drill instructor, directs recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, into the receiving building Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Miller, 26, from Trenton, N.J., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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New recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, prepare to make a quick, pre-scripted phone call shortly after arriving on Parris Island, S.C., for Marine Corps recruit training Aug. 26, 2013.  The phone calls are made to notify a recruitâEUR(TM)s next-of-kin of their safe arrival. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

New recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, prepare to make a quick, pre-scripted phone call shortly after arriving on Parris Island, S.C., for Marine Corps recruit training Aug. 26, 2013. The phone calls are made to notify a recruitâEUR(TM)s next-of-kin of their safe arrival. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Young men from across the eastern United States arrived at Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013, for the chance to earn the title of United States Marine. Most of these young men, now recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, will be transformed during the next 13 weeks into basic Marines, representing the epitome of personal character, selflessness and military virtue. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Young men from across the eastern United States arrived at Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013, for the chance to earn the title of United States Marine. Most of these young men, now recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, will be transformed during the next 13 weeks into basic Marines, representing the epitome of personal character, selflessness and military virtue. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Young men from across the eastern United States sprint off buses onto the legendary yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Most of these young men, now recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, will be transformed during the next 13 weeks into basic Marines, representing the epitome of personal character, selflessness and military virtue. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Young men from across the eastern United States sprint off buses onto the legendary yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Most of these young men, now recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, will be transformed during the next 13 weeks into basic Marines, representing the epitome of personal character, selflessness and military virtue. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, take their first official steps into training Aug. 26, 2013 on Parris Island, S.C. Vehicles loaded with soon-to-be recruits began arriving at Parris IslandâEUR(TM)s receiving building at 6 p.m., and continued to trickle in throughout the next few days. The first hour on the island is one of many recruits will spend learning what it takes to earn the title of United States Marine. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, take their first official steps into training Aug. 26, 2013 on Parris Island, S.C. Vehicles loaded with soon-to-be recruits began arriving at Parris IslandâEUR(TM)s receiving building at 6 p.m., and continued to trickle in throughout the next few days. The first hour on the island is one of many recruits will spend learning what it takes to earn the title of United States Marine. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Young men from across the eastern United States prepare to step through the doors of the receiving building Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. These steps will symbolize the transition from civilians to Marine recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, and the beginning of their transformation into United States Marines. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Young men from across the eastern United States prepare to step through the doors of the receiving building Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. These steps will symbolize the transition from civilians to Marine recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, and the beginning of their transformation into United States Marines. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, tie identification tags to their shoes shortly after arriving on Parris Island, S.C., for Marine Corps recruit training Aug. 26, 2013. The recruits spent the night completing paperwork and receiving haircuts and gear in preparation for the next 13 weeks of training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)

Recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, tie identification tags to their shoes shortly after arriving on Parris Island, S.C., for Marine Corps recruit training Aug. 26, 2013. The recruits spent the night completing paperwork and receiving haircuts and gear in preparation for the next 13 weeks of training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink) (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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Young men arrived for Marine Corps recruit training on Parris Island, S.C., from all over the eastern United States on Aug. 26, 2013. Most of these young men, now recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, will be transformed during the next 13 weeks into basic Marines, representing the epitome of personal character, selflessness and military virtue. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink

Young men arrived for Marine Corps recruit training on Parris Island, S.C., from all over the eastern United States on Aug. 26, 2013. Most of these young men, now recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, will be transformed during the next 13 weeks into basic Marines, representing the epitome of personal character, selflessness and military virtue. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)


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PARRIS ISLAND, S.C. --

Young men from across the eastern United States stepped on Parris Island’s legendary yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, to begin their journey to the title of United States Marine.

Vehicles loaded with soon-to-be recruits began arriving at Parris Island’s receiving building at 6 p.m., and continued to trickle in throughout the next few days. The first night comes as a shock for most as they deal with stress, sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013.



2 Comments


  • John Stevenson 214 days ago
    Back in 1961. I remember waking and everyone got their hair cut late the day before.and look around and all these boys looked the same because we were all bald. It to several days until we could recognize each other.
  • Tom Cunnally 214 days ago
    12/27/1953...I wondered if I would ever complete ten weeks of boot training at Parris Island because our junior DIs were making our lives miserable to say the least

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