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Marine Corps Recruit Depot

Eastern Recruiting Region

Parris Island, South Carolina
MCRD Parris Island Photo Gallery
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Young men from across the eastern United States prepare to step through the doors of the receiving building Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. These steps will symbolize the transition from civilians to Marine recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, and the beginning of their transformation into United States Marines. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Young men from across the eastern United States arrived at Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013, for the chance to earn the title of United States Marine. Most of these young men, now recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, will be transformed during the next 13 weeks into basic Marines, representing the epitome of personal character, selflessness and military virtue. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Young men arrived for Marine Corps recruit training on Parris Island, S.C., from all over the eastern United States on Aug. 26, 2013. Most of these young men, now recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, will be transformed during the next 13 weeks into basic Marines, representing the epitome of personal character, selflessness and military virtue. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink
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Future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, take their first official steps into training Aug. 26, 2013 on Parris Island, S.C. Vehicles loaded with soon-to-be recruits began arriving at Parris IslandâEUR(TM)s receiving building at 6 p.m., and continued to trickle in throughout the next few days. The first hour on the island is one of many recruits will spend learning what it takes to earn the title of United States Marine. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Young men from across the eastern United States sprint off buses onto the legendary yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Most of these young men, now recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, will be transformed during the next 13 weeks into basic Marines, representing the epitome of personal character, selflessness and military virtue. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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The Eagle, Globe and Anchor has been a part of the Marine Corps uniform since 1868 and became the official emblem of the Marine Corps in 1955. This small piece of metal that only costs a few dollars is priceless to the new Marines who have endured the last 12 weeks of intense training to earn it. This ceremony has been a tradition on Parris Island since the first Crucible in 1996. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 13, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
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Drill instructors of Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, and Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, present their new Marines with Eagle, Globe and Anchors during the emblem ceremony Sept. 7, 2013, at the Iwo Jima flag raising statue on Parris Island, S.C. This ceremony marks the end of the 54-hour culminating event of training known as the Crucible and is the first time recruits are called Marines. Delta and Papa Companies are scheduled to graduate Sept. 13, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
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Sgt. Joseph Boucher, a drill instructor of Platoon 1068, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, presents Rct. Dylan Yagle with an Eagle, Globe and Anchor during the emblem ceremony Sept. 7, 2013, at the Iwo Jima flag raising statue on Parris Island, S.C. This is the first time drill instructors such as Boucher, a 27-year-old native of Kingston, N.H., call their recruits Marines. Yagle, an 18-year-old native of Fort Mill, S.C., is the third Marine in his family, following in the footsteps of his brother, Capt. Austin Yagle, and his father, Andrew Yagle, a retired sergeant major. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 13, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
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Rct. David Fairfax, Platoon 1068, Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, waits to receive his Eagle, Globe and Anchor during the emblem ceremony Sept. 7, 2013, at the Iwo Jima flag raising statue on Parris Island, S.C. This ceremony has been a tradition since the first Crucible in 1996. Fairfax, an 18-year-old native of Weymouth, Mass., is scheduled to graduate Sept. 13, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
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New Marines of Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, renew the oath of enlistment during a ceremony in which they received their Eagle, Globe and Anchor emblems Sept. 7, 2013, at the Iwo Jima flag raising statue on Parris Island, S.C. This ceremony marks the end of the 54-hour culminating event of training known as the Crucible and is the first time recruits are called Marines. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 13, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
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Parris Island Marines raise a flag during a ceremony in which new Marines of Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, and Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, received their Eagle, Globe and Anchor emblems Sept. 7, 2013, at the Iwo Jima flag raising statue on Parris Island, S.C. This ceremony has been a tradition since the first Crucible in 1996. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 13, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
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New Marines of Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, bow their heads during the emblem ceremony Sept. 7, 2013, at the Iwo Jima flag raising statue on Parris Island, S.C. This ceremony marks the end of the 54-hour culminating event of training known as the Crucible and is the first time recruits are called Marines by their drill instructors who present them with their first Eagle, Globe and Anchor. Delta Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 13, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. MaryAnn Hill)
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Recruits of Golf, Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, climb over a wall during the obstacle course Feb. 25, 2013 on Parris Island.
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Rct. Nathan Dix, a 19-year-old native of Pemberville, Ohio, is currently training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., in hopes of earning the title of United States Marine. Dix is training with Platoon 3074, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, and is scheduled to graduate Oct. 6, 2013. “I decided to join the Marine Corps because the Marine Corps offered a challenge that none of the other branches could offer me. The Marine Corps is respected and well known throughout the world, and anyone who wanted to be the best will join. I joined the military because … I wanted to fight for a cause that I believe in,” said Dix, who graduated from Eastwood High School in Luckey, Ohio, in 2011. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Land navigation training is part of the recruits’ Basic Warrior Training week, which introduces them to rudimentary combat skills.
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New recruits prepare to step through the silver doors of the receiving building, an action which symbolizes the transition from civilians to recruits and the beginning of their transformation into United States Marines.
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