Marine Corps Recruit Depot

 

Marine Corps Recruit Depot

Eastern Recruiting Region

Parris Island, South Carolina
MCRD Parris Island Photo Gallery
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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, center, speaks with Sgt. Maj. of the Marine Corps Ronald Green, left, and 1st Lt. Terri L. Piekosz, a series commander with November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, March 3, 2016, on Parris Island, S.C. Mabus visited Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island in order to see firsthand how young men and women from across the country are transformed into United States Marines. Recruit training was consolidated under Recruit Training Regiment in 1986, and since then, all those desiring to complete recruit training must follow the same training program of instruction, and must complete the same graduation requirements. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Greg Thomas)
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Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, center, speaks with Capt. Taylor Bates, left, commander of Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, and Capt. Larry Black Jr., commander of Delta Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, about the Crucible March 3, 2016, on Parris Island, S.C. Parris Island is the only place in the Marine Corps where enlisted males and females undergo 70 training days to earn the title United States Marine. Today, approximately 19,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 12 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 49 percent of male recruits and 100 percent of female recruits in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Staff Sgt. Greg Thomas)
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Staff Sgt. Roger L. Petersen currently serves as a Marine Corps drill instructor with Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Petersen joined the Marine Corps in June 2001 and became a drill instructor in June 2014. “I became a drill instructor because I wanted to give back to the Marine Corps,” said Petersen, a 32-year-old native of Wichita Falls, Texas. “I have been in for 14 years, and being a drill instructor was one of the only things I haven’t done yet.” About 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
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Recruits of November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, maneuver under concertina wire on a combat training course March 24, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. These skills will be broadened during follow-on training at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Pfc. Vanessa Austin)
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Drill Instructor Staff Sgt. Maurice S. Jones, with Platoon 3038, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, encourages his recruits to push themselves through an incentive training session March 5, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors, such as Jones, 28, from Philadelphia, must instill in recruits. India Company is scheduled to graduate May 15, 2015. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
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Rct. Tyler C. Cunningham, Platoon 1068, Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, crawls through a combat training course Aug. 4, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The course is part of Basic Warrior Training, held during the ninth week of boot camp, which focuses on basic field-related skills all Marines must know. The initial combat training recruits receive will be broadened after boot camp during follow-on training at Camp Lejeune, N.C. Cunningham, 23, is from Enfield, Conn. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vanessa Austin)
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Sgt. Stephan G. Bacchus, senior drill instructor of Platoon 3004, India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, listens to his recruits’ explanation of leadership during a core values guided discussion Oct. 28, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. Bacchus, 25, from East Stroudsburg, Pa., discussed with his recruits the importance of growing as a leader both in and out of the Marine Corps. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 19,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Aaron Bolser)
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Sgt. Yonique R. Cousins currently serves as a Marine Corps drill instructor with Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Cousins joined the Marine Corps in Aug. 2008 and became a drill instructor in Dec. 2014. “I strive hard for everything I do,” said Cousins, a 25-year-old native of McDonough, Ga. “No matter what obstacle may come my way, I will overcome it. That is why I’m here.” About 600 Marine Corps drill instructors shape the approximately 20,000 recruits who come to Parris Island annually into basic United States Marines. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
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Drill instructors for Platoon 1086, Charlie Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, recite the Drill Instructor Pledge on July 25, 2015, before taking charge of the young men they are expected to mold into Marines on Parris Island, S.C. In the pledge, drill instructors promise to train their recruits to the best of their abilities, meaning they will not give up on the recruits even when the recruits may give up on themselves. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
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A new Marine of Fox Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, greets his family following his graduation ceremony June 5, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The Marines spent nearly 13 weeks away from home training to earn their places in the Corps. (Photo by Sgt. Jennifer Schubert)
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Mary B. Skarote, an exercise planner for the 2015 Parris Island hurricane exercise, discusses evacuation procedures with a Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, drill instructor June 24, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The practiced evacuation was part of a hurricane exercise that simulated the efforts needed to evacuate permanent personnel, recruits and equipment. After the week-long exercise, officials will review the outcome and apply any necessary changes to ensure MCRD Parris Island can continue making Marines regardless of what mother nature throws at the Lowcountry.
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Recruits of Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, practice hurricane evacuation procedures June 24, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The practiced evacuation was part of a hurricane exercise that simulated the efforts needed to evacuate permanent personnel, recruits and equipment. After the week-long exercise, officials will review the outcome and apply any necessary changes to ensure Parris Island can continue making Marines regardless of what mother nature throws at the Lowcountry.
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Senior Drill Instructor Gunnery Sgt. Christopher S. Miles ensures accountability of Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, recruits during a hurricane evacuation exercise June 24, 2015. The exercise simulated the efforts needed to evacuate permanent personnel, recruits and equipment. After the week-long exercise, officials will review the outcome and apply any necessary changes to ensure Parris Island can continue making Marines regardless of what mother nature throws at the Lowcountry. Miles, 33, is from Lily, Ky.
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Recruits of Lima Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, practice hurricane evacuation procedures June 24, 2015, on Parris Island, S.C. The practiced evacuation was part of a hurricane exercise that simulated the efforts needed to evacuate permanent personnel, recruits and equipment. After the week-long exercise, officials will review the outcome and apply any necessary changes to ensure Parris Island can continue making Marines regardless of what mother nature throws at the Lowcountry.
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Sgt. Jonathan Owens, senior drill instructor assigned to Recruit Processing Company, Support Battalion, greets golfers before a tournament at the Legends at Parris Island golf course June 8, 2015. The "receiving" tournament was the first of four scheduled tournaments leading up to the celebration of Parris Island's centennial anniversary in October.
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Sgt. Jonathan Owens, senior drill instructor assigned to Recruit Processing Company, Support Battalion, greets golfers before a tournament at the Legends at Parris Island golf course June 8, 2015. The "receiving" tournament was the first of four scheduled tournaments leading up to the celebration of Parris Island's centennial anniversary in October.
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