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Marine Corps Recruit Depot

Eastern Recruiting Region

Parris Island, South Carolina
MCRD Parris Island Photo Gallery
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Staff Sgt. Brian Sixto, a drill instructor for Platoon 3034, encourages Rct. Edgar Barua-Gomez, Platoon 3034, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to respond to orders March 12, 2014, during an incentive training session on Parris Island, S.C. Discipline, defined as the instant and willing obedience to all orders, respect for authority and self-reliance, is a key trait drill instructors like Sixto, 28, from Hobson, Texas, must instill in recruits. Barua-Gomez, 23, from Kensington, Md., is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Family members embrace their new Marine of Charlie Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, following the Family Day ceremony April 3, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The Marines spent nearly three months training to earn their places in the Corps. Charlie Company graduated April 4, 2014. (Photo by Cpl. Octavia Davis)
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Drill instructors with Platoon 3032, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, wait to unleash themselves on their recruits shortly after being introduced March 1, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. This was the first encounter the recruits had with the Marines responsible for the following 12 weeks of training. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate May 23, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Rct. Julian Morris carries Rct. Jacob Ligon, both with Platoon 2028, Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, during a martial arts endurance course Feb. 6, 2014, on Parris Island, S.C. The course consists of different stations at which recruits practice martial arts techniques they learned earlier in training to increase their proficiency, strength and stamina. The course is part of the Marine Corps Martial Arts Program, which combines hand-to-hand combat skills with mental discipline and character development to help transform recruits into honorable warriors. Morris, a 20-year-old native of Dover, N.J., and Ligon, a 19-year-old native of Monroe, La., are scheduled to graduate April 11, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Vaniah Temple)
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Sgt. Joseph Ramey, a drill instructor with Platoon 3078, conducts an incentive training session with recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, on July 24, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Drill instructors such as Ramey, 24, from Liberty, Ind., use these sessions to instill discipline and motivation in recruits while correcting minor disciplinary infractions. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate Oct. 4, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Rct. Jeremy Moore, Platoon 2010, Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, responds to orders from a Marine Corps martial arts instructor during a martial arts training session Nov. 14, 2013.
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Sgt. Kingsley Nwosu, a drill instructor of Platoon 1005, Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, shouts at recruits to do exercises faster during an incentive training session Nov. 14, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C
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Staff Sgt. Warren Wofford, senior drill instructor for Platoon 3005, Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, speaks with his recruits for the first time Oct. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Wofford, 28, from Columbus, Ga., told his recruits what would be expected of them during their journey to become Marines and also what to expect from the Marines who would train them. Mike Company is scheduled to graduate Jan. 17, 2014. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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A new Marine of India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, greets his family following his graduation ceremony Oct. 25, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The Marines spent nearly 13 weeks away from home training to earn their places in the Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Pvt. Christopher Stephens, with Platoon 2073, Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion weighed 359 pounds when he first decided he wanted to join the Marine Corps. The 20-year-old native of Phenix City, Ala., lost more than 175 pounds just to ship to boot camp and weighed a scant 160 pounds just before he graduated Sept. 20, 2013. (Photo Illustration by Pfc. Vaniah Temple)
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Recruits of Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, race through an obstacle course Sept. 21, 2013, as part of a field meet on Parris Island, S.C. Drill instructors selected a team of recruits from each platoon to compete in various events such as tug of war, a relay race, an obstacle course race and a pushup competition. The meet is designed to motivate the recruits for the upcoming Crucible, the 54-hour culminating event of training.
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Rct. Terence Goodman, Platoon 3089, Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, responds to one of the many orders he will receive with on Parris Island, S.C., during his first night of training Aug. 26, 2013. Recruits learn from the moment they step on the yellow footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. Goodman, 24, from Baltimore, is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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New recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, hold up identification cards as they begin their in-processing shortly after arriving on Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013. The recruits spent the night completing paperwork and receiving haircuts and new gear in preparation for the next 13 weeks. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Drill instructors lead new recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, through their first night of Marine Corps recruit training Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The first stressful night comes as a shock for most as they deal with sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Staff Sgt. Carlos Vargas, a senior drill instructor, commands future recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, to step off the bus and onto the yellow footprints Aug. 26, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. The first stressful night comes as a shock for most as they deal with sleep deprivation, new rules and ferocious drill instructors. Vargas, 28, from Longmont, Colo., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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Staff Sgt. Carlos Vargas, a senior drill instructor, issues orders to recruits of Kilo Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, shortly after their arrival to Parris Island, S.C., on Aug. 26, 2013.  Recruits learn from the moment they step on the yellow footprints that they are expected to move with speed and intensity and to respond to all commands loudly and confidently. Vargas, 28, from Longmont, Colo., is one of a handful of drill instructors responsible for preparing new recruits for training. Kilo Company is scheduled to graduate Nov. 22, 2013. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Cpl. Caitlin Brink)
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