Photos
MCRD Parris Island Photo Gallery
A recruit with Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion attempts to overcome an obstacle on the obstacle course portion of the Crucible Jan. 14, 2020 at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. The Crucible is recruit training’s 54-hour culminating event that involves food and sleep deprivation and the completion of myriad events for recruits to complete in order to claim the title United States Marine.
A recruit with Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion posts security while her fellow recruits navigate an obstacle during the Crucible Jan. 15, 2020 at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. The Crucible is recruit training’s 54-hour culminating event that involves food and sleep deprivation and the completion of myriad events for recruits to complete in order to claim the title United States Marine.
A recruit with Hotel Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion leaps to complete an obstacle during the Crucible Jan. 15, 2020 at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. The Crucible is recruit training’s 54-hour culminating event that involves food and sleep deprivation and the completion of myriad events for recruits to complete in order to claim the title United States Marine.
Recruits with Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, learn how to properly rappel from the rappel tower at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., Jan. 19, 2021. The rappel tower is used to teach the recruits to overcome fear and trust their equipment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Godfrey Ampong)
A recruit with November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, jumps off the tower during basic swim qualification aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Jan. 13, 2021. The tower is used to simulate aborting a ship at sea and is followed by a 25 meter swim. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Samuel C. Fletcher)
Recruits with Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, prepare to conduct pugil sticks bouts aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Jan. 11, 2021. Pugil sticks help recruits practice the fundamentals of Marine Corps Martial Arts. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Dylan Walters)
Recruits with Papa Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, conduct pugil sticks bouts aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Jan. 11, 2021. Pugil sticks help recruits practice the fundamentals of Marine Corps Martial Arts. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Dylan Walters)
Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island
Recruits with November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, work together to move as a fire team through events during the Crucible on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Dec 3, 2020. The Crucible is recruit training’s 54-hour culminating event that involves food and sleep deprivation and the completion of myriad events for recruits to complete in order to claim the title United States Marine.
Recruits with November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, work together to move as a fire team through events during the Crucible on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Dec 3, 2020. The Crucible is recruit training’s 54-hour culminating event that involves food and sleep deprivation and the completion of myriad events for recruits to complete in order to claim the title United States Marine.
Recruits of Special Training Company, Support Battalion, do pullups during a physical training session July 10, 2013, Parris Island, S.C. Some recruits are removed from normal training due to medical or physical conditions that prevent them from safely progressing through recruit training. While assigned to the company, recruits rehabilitate in order to return to training where they left off. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
"The only thing that matters is that you never gave up."



As part of graduations aboard the Depot, The Special Training Company (STC) holds a Recovered Warriors Ceremony where new Marines, alongside the Company's staff, give advice and motivational words to those still in therapy and recovery. 



The STC is a place for recruits and recently graduated Marines who have injuries and illnesses that need further attention before they are able to return to recruit training or continue on to the next stage of entry-level training.



(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Dana Beesley)
U.S. Marine Corps Staff Sgt. Richard Hibble, a senior drill instructor with Recruit Processing Company, Support Battalion, orders recruits of Bravo Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, and November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, to walk through the iconic silver doors June 5, 2017, on Parris Island, S.C. Senior drill instructors, like Hibble, 28, from Kenilworth, N.J., are responsible for the accountability and administrative processing of new recruits before they start training with their company drill instructors. Bravo Company is scheduled to graduate Sept. 1, 2017. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 19,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 12 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 49 percent of male recruits and 100 percent of female recruits in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carlin Warren)
A drill instructor with Recruit Processing Company, Support Battalion, gives new recruits of Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, one of their first orders on Parris Island, S.C., May 22, 2017. Recruits must go through processing to ensure they have the necessary uniforms and equipment to begin training. Echo Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 18, 2017. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 19,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 12 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 49 perceA U.S. Marine Corps drill instructor with Recruit Processing Company, Support Battalion, gives new recruits of Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, one of their first orders on Parris Island, S.C., May 22, 2017. Recruits must go through processing to ensure they have the necessary uniforms and equipment to begin training. Echo Company is scheduled to graduate Aug. 18, 2017. Parris Island has been the site of Marine Corps recruit training since Nov. 1, 1915. Today, approximately 19,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 12 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for approximately 49 percent of male recruits and 100 percent of female recruits in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carlin Warren)nt of male recruits and 100 percent of female recruits in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. Carlin Warren)
Recruits with Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, listen to instructions and their safety brief prior to Crucible boxing bouts on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Oct. 8, 2020. The Crucible is the final test of physical and mental endurance recruits will face before earning the title United States Marine, and is a culmination of all of the skills learned throughout recruit training.



(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Dana Beesley)
Recruits with Mike Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion spar with each other during Crucible boxing bouts on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Oct. 8, 2020. The Crucible is the final test of physical and mental endurance recruits will face before earning the title United States Marine, and is a culmination of all of the skills learned throughout recruit training.



(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Dana Beesley)
Recruits of Special Training Company, Support Battalion, do crunches during a physical training session July 10, 2013, on Parris Island, S.C. Some recruits are removed from normal training due to medical or physical conditions that prevent them from safely progressing through recruit training. While assigned to the company, recruits rehabilitate in order to return to training where they left off. Approximately 20,000 recruits come to Parris Island annually for the chance to become United States Marines by enduring 13 weeks of rigorous, transformative training. Parris Island is home to entry-level enlisted training for 50 percent of males and 100 percent of for females in the Marine Corps. (Photo by Lance Cpl. David Bessey)
Gunnery Sgt. Nathaniel Baker with Weapons and Field Training Battalion was awarded the Gunnery Sgt. Carlos N. Hathcock II award on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., Sept. 30, 2020. Baker was awarded for his performance while serving as the Hue City Range Officer-in-Charge in 2019.
Staff Sgt. Eric. Minton, a Marine Corps Instructor Water Survival, instructs the recruits on one of the swim qualification events at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., Dec. 17, 2019. During the swim qualification course the recruits are required to complete a series of basic water survival techniques to continue on with training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Samuel C. Fletcher)
Recruit Processing Company - responsible for entry-level processing all recruits once they arrive on Parris Island as well as those recruits recommended for separation prior to completing training.