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MCRD Parris Island

 

MCRD Parris Island

Eastern Recruiting Region

"We Make Marines"
MCRD Parris Island Photo Gallery
Members of the Montford Point Marine Association get together following the graduation of India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion at the Peatross Parade Deck on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., Mar. 29, 2019. The first African Americans Marines were trained at Camp Montford Point in Jacksonville, N.C., from 1942-1949.
Marines with India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, graduated from recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, March 29. India Company is the first combined company of male and female recruits to graduate from recruit training. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Cpl. Vivien Alstad/Released)
Recruit Dillon Knighton, with Fox Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, poses for a photo after completing a Combat Fitness Test at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, South Carolina March 20, 2019. Knighton is a native of Columbus, North Carolina.
Staff Sgt. Christopher Brandle, the enlisted aide for Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, prepares Brig. Gen. James Glynn's uniforms Jan. 15, 2019. Brandle, a 29-year old from Fresno, Calif., is responsible for the cleanliness and maintenance of the general's house, his uniform and cooking for daily meals and events. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carlin Warren)
Staff Sgt. Christopher Brandle, the enlisted aide for Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, guides Gunnery Sgt. Julio Aquayo while preparing a dinner for the depot's commanding general and his guests Jan. 10, 2019. As Brandle's replacement, aguayo will be responsible for the cleanliness and maintenance of the general's home, his uniforms and cooking for daily meals and events. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carlin Warren)
Staff Sgt. Brandle prepares dinner for the depot commanding general and his guests Jan. 10, 2019. Cooking is one of the many responsibilities he has as the enlisted aide. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Carlin Warren)
Recruit Joseph Dickman with India Company, 3rd Recruit Training Battalion, engages in body sparring and pugil sticks during the crucible at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C., Mar. 15, 2019. Body sparring and pugil sticks help recruits apply the fundamentals of Marine Corps martial arts. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Shane T. Manson)
Drill instructors with Kilo Company set the tone for their new recruits during forming day one at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. Jan. 26, 2019. Kilo Company will spend forming day learning the rules and regulations of recruit training, regarding everything from how to act in the squad bay to how to speak to drill instructors.
(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Dana Beesley)
Recruits with November Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, complete obstacles during the Crucible at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, Feb, 21. The Crucible is a 54-hour culminating event that requires recruits to work as a team and overcome challenges in order to earn the title United States Marine. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Warrant Officer Bobby J. Yarbrough/Released)
Pfc. Nicholes Kelley is reunited with his family during Family Day at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, Feb. 28. Family Day is the day before graduation and is the first time families have seen their Marine since they left home for recruit training. (U.S. Marine Corps photos by Warrant Officer Bobby J. Yarbrough/Released)
Recruits with Echo Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, complete the obstacle course during the Crucible on Parris Island, S.C., Feb. 21, 2019.  The obstacle course challenges recruits to work together as a team and overcome obstacles.  (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Lance Cpl. Yamil Casarreal)
Recruits with Bravo Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, complete swim qualification training at the pool aboard Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island , S.C., Feb 5. The swim qualificiation is a graduation requirement for recruit training and can be an annual training requirement for Marines. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Warrant Officer Bobby J. Yarbrough/Released)
New recruits with Lima Company, Third Recruit Training Battalion, receive their first haircuts during receiving Feb. 20, 2019 on Parris Island, S.C.  A small step in the transformation of becoming United States Marines, weekly haircuts are meant to strip recruits of their individuality and for hygienic purposes. During their first night on the island, recruits are issued gear and uniforms, receive haircuts, and process in their medical and dental records.
(U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Dana Beesley)
Recruits with Fox Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion, rappel down the rappel tower aboard Marine Corps Depot Parris Island,  Feb. 4. The rappel tower is a training event designed to instill confidence within recruits and introduce them to environments they may encounter while serving in the Marine Corps. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl.Yamil Casarreal)
Recruits with Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, complete the day movement course during the unit's basic warrior training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island Feb. 1. (Official Marine Corps photo by Warrant Officer Bobby J. Yarbrough/Released)
Pfc. Elizabeth Reetz, the honor graduate of platoon 4001, Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, gave us some insight on what it means to be the platoon guide and why she wanted to lead from the front.

“When a recruit is appointed as the guide, that recruit is in charge of helping the other recruits and assisting the drill instructors by carrying out their instructions. Having this leadership position helps balance everything out and keep good order and discipline within the platoon even when the drill instructors are not around.”

“I remember how my rack mate used to motivate me and lift up my spirit when I was feeling down. I wanted to act like her and make other recruits feel the same way she made me feel. Throughout recruit training, I always thought to myself, ‘No matter how down I am feeling, someone else is feeling worse. I need to push myself to always be the one that is positive and pushing others to be their best.’”
Pfc. Elizabeth Reetz, the honor graduate of platoon 4001, Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, gave us some insight on what it means to be the platoon guide and why she wanted to lead from the front.

“When a recruit is appointed as the guide, that recruit is in charge of helping the other recruits and assisting the drill instructors by carrying out their instructions. Having this leadership position helps balance everything out and keep good order and discipline within the platoon even when the drill instructors are not around.”

“I remember how my rack mate used to motivate me and lift up my spirit when I was feeling down. I wanted to act like her and make other recruits feel the same way she made me feel. Throughout recruit training, I always thought to myself, ‘No matter how down I am feeling, someone else is feeling worse. I need to push myself to always be the one that is positive and pushing others to be their best.’”
Brig. Gen. William H. Swan tours the recruit receiving building at Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, Jan. 3, 2019. Swan toured the base before acting as the Parade Reviewing Official for the graduation of Golf Company, 2nd Recruit Training Battalion.
Pfc. Elizabeth Reetz, the honor graduate of platoon 4001, Oscar Company, 4th Recruit Training Battalion, gave us some insight on what it means to be the platoon guide and why she wanted to lead from the front.

“When a recruit is appointed as the guide, that recruit is in charge of helping the other recruits and assisting the drill instructors by carrying out their instructions. Having this leadership position helps balance everything out and keep good order and discipline within the platoon even when the drill instructors are not around.”

“I remember how my rack mate used to motivate me and lift up my spirit when I was feeling down. I wanted to act like her and make other recruits feel the same way she made me feel. Throughout recruit training, I always thought to myself, ‘No matter how down I am feeling, someone else is feeling worse. I need to push myself to always be the one that is positive and pushing others to be their best.’”
Drill instructors are meritoriously promoted at the All-Weather Training Facility on Marine Corps Recruit Depot Parris Island, S.C. January 2, 2019. The drill instructors were meritoriously promoted to the next rank by Brig. Gen. James F. Glynn, commanding general, and Depot Sergeant Major, Sgt. Maj. William C. Carter. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Shane T. Manson)